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Harry Potter Publisher, Scholastic, Commits to Increased Green Paper

Harry Potter Publisher, Scholastic, Commits to Increased Green Paper

January 11, 2008 —

Children and youth genre publisher, Scholastic (bringing us the Harry Potter series), set the bar higher for publishers in announcing its intention to use more managed forest-certified and recycled paper in its books, magazines and fliers. The publishing giant also announced a new website, Scholastic’s Act Green—for educating kids on ecological, environmental and socially responsible issues. In 2007, the company stood out by printing the seventh Harry Potter book on post-consumer waste paper.

Scholastic is working with the Rainforest Alliance and other groups to use paper certified by the Forest Stewardship Council for 30% of their publishing over the next five years. Additionally, they are committing to 25% of their publishing paper needs coming from recycled paper (75% of which is post consumer waste). Calculations from the Environmental Defense Paper Calculator state that this use of post consumer waste paper alone will reduce greenhouse emission gasses by 23,998,000 lbs.

In 2007, Scholastic bought 95,000 tons of paper—4 percent was FSC-certified and 11 percent was post consumer waste recycled. "Scholastic's environmental purchasing policy will set the bar for publishers, and its goal of ensuring that 30 percent of its paper supply is FSC-certified by 2012 will help create more demand for paper from responsibly managed forests," observed Rainforest Alliances Executive Director, Tensie Whelan.

Scholastic is also integrating green construction and maintenance practices into its headquarters and other company buildings

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