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Human Rights

Socially Responsible Investing (SRI)

Socially Responsible Investing (SRI)

In recent years, many people have become interested in Socially Responsible Investing, or SRI (also known as ethical investing). a growing field in which money managers buy and sell stocks based on a company's environmental and social record, labor relations and other issues. Over the past decade or so, the growth of ‘ethical funds’ has been substantial, from approximately 10 funds in the early to mid-1990s to over 50 different funds by 2005. Although the $36 billion invested in these mutual funds in 2005 was still less than 1 percent of the $5.6 trillion market, it was more than triple the level of such investment in 2000.

October 13, 2007

Divesting from Sudan

Divesting from Sudan

Since early 2000s, the situation in Sudan, where some people have estimated that over 200,000 people have been killed, has gained increasing attention around the world. A new strategy has emerged in the U.S. to attempt to force the repressive Sudanese government to stop the violence.  Divestment, a strategy used in the 1980s in opposition to the South African government’s apartheid policy, has been revived and is quickly spreading.  Intended to withdraw funds and money from the country, supporters of divestment hope it will force the Sudanese government to stop using money for its military regime.

October 13, 2007

A New Brand for Nike, a Better Fit for American Indians

A New Brand for Nike, a Better Fit for American Indians

Nike unveils a new shoe designed especially for the unique contours of the American Indian foot and sold exclusively through its Native American business program. Feathers and sunrises included.

October 9, 2007

Timberland CEO Calls for Green Shoe Labels

Timberland CEO Calls for Green Shoe Labels

Jeffrey B. Swartz, the chief executive of Timberland, believes that the athletic shoe industry has made strides in combating child labor—but has fallen behind on the environmental front.  He told the New York Times, "Ask people what they know about the human rights or environmental track record of the brand they just bought, and they walk away. People buy on the basis of product attributes, not brand attributes."

September 29, 2007

Killer Coke?

Killer Coke?

In the summer of 2003, Colombian trade union SinalTrainal called for an international boycott of Coca-Cola products.  They alleged that paramilitaries working on behalf of local-owned Coke bottlers intimidated, kidnapped, and even murdered workers at some of Coke’s bottling plants in order to drive down wages in Colombia.  Protests against Coke continue in Columbia, the United States, Canada, India, and throughout Europe.

September 26, 2007

Buy It

Don't Buy It

  • Altria? Formerly known as Philip Morris
  • World's largest oil company--human rights, oil spills and misinformation about climate change
  • Processed meat sold as 'natural' food. Union-buster.
  • Numerous ethical problems with largest maker of household products in U.S.
  • Unethical marketing of baby formula in developing nations